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Navigating Digital Resources for Mental Health

Updated: Oct 19

By: Kimberly Gevint, LCSW-R


As we emerge from the Pandemic, the topic of mental health continues to be peppered throughout our news outlets. The pandemic has taken its toll and as a result, mental health support has become more accessible to those in need than ever before. But understanding how to navigate the plethora of options is not always so simple. Trellus Health wants to make sure you know how to find help in a time when digital health is available and more promising than ever before.



What is the difference between a psychotherapist and a psychiatrist?

A therapist is a licensed counselor or psychologist who uses talk therapy to help you work through issues that cause symptoms of anxiety, depression, anger, mood instability, stress and more. A psychotherapist can help a person understand their challenges from a unique perspective and with your input, offer tailored strategies to work through an issue. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor who specializes in mental health and is often a subset within the mental health field. Psychiatrists prescribe medications for mental health disorders, and they can utilize many kinds of treatment options.

How do I know if I need support for my mental health?

If you have been feeling depressed, anxious, irritable, or fatigued because of negative thoughts, it may be time to seek professional guidance. Consider how your mental health in conjunction with your IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) is impacting your functioning and ability to proceed with your daily routine. Finding a mental health expert who specializes in chronic conditions might help you better understand the brain-gut connection and as a result, provide you with immense relief through talk therapy. A few websites to filter by specialty are:

  1. Psychologytoday.com

  2. Helloalma.com

  3. Headway.co

  4. American Board of Professional Psychology

  5. American Psychological Association Practice Organization

  6. Rome Foundation Gastropsychologist Directory

  7. Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy

Reach out to a resilience team expert at Trellus Health if you need more options.

I’ve never done this before. How do I choose a therapist and what should I be looking for in one?

Consider your values and beliefs as well as your deal breakers. The more flexible you can be, the more options you may have. Are you only comfortable working with a particular gender or age group? Race or ethnicity? How about language? Finding a therapist who is a good match for you can often feel like a job interview except when you are the interviewer!


Many therapists now offer a free 10–15-minute consultation online which is helpful on both ends. Consider what questions you need answered for this to feel like a match. It may be helpful to ask how much experience the mental health professional you are considering has treating people who are experiencing something similar to what you are. You also may want to ask about things like payment plans, scheduling policies, and insurance coverage/reimbursement at this initial consultation (see #4 for more details on this below!).

Remember, a therapist can understand you even if they themselves do not share your diagnosis. They have education and years of training that equips them to support and treat you. Do not hesitate to interview a few of them to make sure you feel comfortable! You are hiring them for the most important job!

How will I pay for this?


If you are using insurance to pay for therapy, you can often filter on the various websites by your insurance carrier. Alternatively, you can contact your insurance company and request a list of mental health referrals that are in network. Sometimes these lists are outdated so you may want to make some time to double check the names that are given to you. No one likes surprises so it is best to do your research and make sure whoever you are going to see, even for a consultation, is in network.


If you like the person, you interview but learn they do not take your insurance, that will be disappointing so consider adding this to your list of questions. You can also speak with your insurance company to see if you are participating in out of network benefits. If this is the case, a therapist who does not take insurance may provide you with a Superbill that insurance companies will often accept and pay at least a percentage of but double check on all ends. Some therapists also offer a “sliding scale fee” if you do not have insurance. Know that there are many options available to you from a financial standpoint. If you see someone via telehealth (see #5 for more details), you should double check that your insurance will reimburse virtual sessions as well.


Should I try to see someone in-person? Is it better to do telehealth?

Telehealth is more common now than ever before. Research often shows that there is not a difference in treatment outcomes whether you see someone in-person versus via telehealth. (https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/01/trends-online-therapy).

So, often thinking through logistical considerations can help you make an informed decision. Some find not having to deal with a commute to another appointment and being able to get care in the comfort of their own space supportive. Other people may enjoy the routine, privacy, and natural separation from their daily routine that comes with going to an in-person session.


When you are searching for therapists, if you do decide to you would like to see someone via telehealth, you may want to consider finding someone who practices in your state. Although the laws on this are evolving, currently many therapists, unless licensed in multiple states, can only legally provide care to people who are within their state unless that practitioner is licensed in your State. This is also something to speak to a therapist about if you travel frequently – you may want to ask if you need to be in a certain state to receive telehealth care from them.


So, should you pick one over the other? Ultimately, it’s your choice! Both are excellent options, and whatever you feel is most supportive for you, your life, and what you are currently facing is an excellent choice.




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